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Pitch Patterns Play Greater Role in Speech Perception
The pitch of language and sound affects the development of the brain more than previously thought, according to new research. Everyone has a brain stem, but it s tuned differently depending on what sounds are behaviorally relevant to a person, for example, the sounds of his or her mother tongue, Jackson T. Gandour, a linguistics professor at Purdue University, said in a prepared statement. Gandour was to present several of his pitch-processing studies Satu ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Voice Changes May Follow 'Nose Job' in Some Patients
Having a nose job might not just change your profile, it could also change your voice, according to a small new study. Researchers examined voice changes among 22 women and five men who had nose plastic surgery rhinoplasty at two hospitals in Iran. The patients and trained listeners noticed voice changes after surgery, but these changes generally didn t cause problems with speech function, according to the report in the February issue of the journal Plasti ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Prolonged Use of Pacifier Linked to Speech Problems
A pacifier is fine for a while, but don t let your child use one too long, experts say. In a study of 128 children aged 3 to 5 in Patagonia, Chile, researchers found that children who used a pacifier or sucked their fingers for more than three years were three times as likely as other kids to develop speech impediments. The study, published online in the journal BMC Pediatrics , also found that children will have a lower risk of developing speech disorders ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Way to Predict Stroke after 'Mini-Stroke' Found
A mini-stroke can signal the impending possibility of a full-blown stroke, but many are missed or not taken seriously by doctors and patients alike. Now there is a simple risk score that doctors can use to predict whether a patient is likely to have a stroke in the week following a mini-stroke, or transient ischemic attack TIA , British researchers report in the June 21 online issue of The Lancet . A TIA occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery in the bra ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
'Sensitive' Older Sibling May Help Boost Preschoolers' Language Skills
Preschoolers with lots of brothers and sisters seem to develop language skills a bit slower than other kids -- possibly because they get less attention from mom and dad. But a new study suggests that a sensitive older sibling might make up for it. A number of studies have found that parents with a brood of kids have less time to dedicate to any one child s learning. And some have shown that the younger children in those families tend to have less-developed ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Young Adults Would Delay Seeking Stroke Treatment: Survey
Immediate treatment of stroke is crucial, but a new survey finds that three-quarters of young American adults would delay going to the hospital if they had stroke symptoms. Ideally, people with an ischemic stroke blocked blood flow to the brain should receive medical care within three hours to give them the best chance of restoring blood flow to the brain and minimizing or reversing stroke damage, the researchers explained. Timely treatment for stroke is p ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Most Kids With Autism Overcome Language Delays, Study Finds
Severe language delays early in the life of a child with autism can be overcome, especially if a child exhibits nonverbal intelligence. A new study that looked at speech delays in children with autism spectrum disorders found that 70 percent of children who were not stringing words together into even the simplest of phrases by age 4 went on to do so by age 8, and in some cases, even achieved fluent speech. Autism spectrum disorders is an umbrella term for ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
'Groundbreaking' Research Offers Clues to Cause of Dyslexia
People with the reading disability dyslexia may have brain differences that are surprisingly wide-ranging, a new study suggests. Using specialized brain imaging, scientists found that adults and children with dyslexia showed less ability to adapt to sensory information compared to people without the disorder. And the differences were seen not only in the brain s response to written words, which would be expected. People with dyslexia also showed less adapt ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Both Sides of Brain Involved in Speech, Study Finds
Speech involves the use of both sides of the brain, according to a study that may overturn the widely held belief that only one side of the brain is used for this task. The findings improve understanding of how speech is generated in the brain and could help lead to new ways to treat speech problems, the researchers said. They noted that previous conclusions about speech were from studies that relied on indirect measurements of brain activity. This new stu ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
When Anxiety Silences a Child
It s a little-known anxiety disorder that renders one in every 150 children speechless in certain situations. Called selective mutism, the inability to speak is not a choice for these youngsters, experts say. It s best described as a phobia of talking, said Alison Wintgens, an advisor to the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists in England, and author of a resource manual on the condition. It s usually consistent and predictable, with evident pan ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Prosthetic Ears Boost Hearing After Injury
Prosthetic ears can help improve hearing and speech recognition for people who ve lost an outer ear due to injury or cancer surgery, a new U.S. study reports. In many cases where the outer ear pinna has been lost, the external auditory canal is usually intact, and the remainder of the person s hearing system should function normally. In these patients, the physician must strive not only to correct the aesthetic defect caused by the missing pinna, but also ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Your Dog Really Is Listening to You
While people have long believed their dogs understand what they re saying, a new study suggests they are processing the meaning and emotion of words in a human-like way. Past research has shown that dogs respond to different parts of human speech -- including the actual content and the emotional tone, said study author Victoria Ratcliffe. But her team s findings give a deeper insight into the canine brain, according to Ratcliffe, a Ph.D. candidate at the U ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28