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Finally, Proof That Hearing Aids Help
Millions of older Americans are hard of hearing, but solid evidence about the value of hearing aids has been lacking -- until now. New research findings provide firm evidence that hearing aids do, in fact, provide significant benefit to older adults, said lead author Larry Humes, a professor at Indiana University s department of speech and hearing sciences. Only 30 percent of Americans 70 and older with hearing loss who could benefit from hearing aids have ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Teens With Autism More Likely to Land in ER, Study Finds
U.S. teens with autism are four times more likely to visit an emergency room than those without the disorder, a new report says. The Penn State College of Medicine researchers said the likelihood of an ER visit for a teen with autism increased five-fold from 2005 to 2013. The findings suggest that young people with autism may require better access to primary and specialist care, the researchers said. We believe if their regular medical and behavioral speci ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
How Your Brain 'Hears' Speech
New research into human understanding of language suggests that the brain comprehends speech by picking up on certain kinds of sounds -- so-called acoustic signatures. This is a very intriguing glimpse into speech processing, study senior author Dr. Edward Chang, a neurosurgeon and neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco, said in a university news release. The brain regions where speech is processed had been identified, but no one has ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Blindness Biggest Fear for Many Americans
Blindness is what many Americans fear most, a new survey shows. These findings underscore the importance of good eyesight to most and that having good vision is key to one s overall sense of well-being, said lead researcher Dr. Adrienne Scott and colleagues. Scott is an assistant professor of opthalmology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. The consistency of these findings among the varying ethnic racial groups underscores the imp ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Study Links Stuttering to Less Blood Flow in Brain
Reduced blood flow in a part of the brain that s linked to speech may put people at risk for stuttering, a small study suggests. There are also signs that the lower the blood flow in regions of the brain tied to speech and language, the more severe the stuttering, the researchers added. When other portions of the brain circuit related to speech were also affected according to our blood flow measurements, we saw more severe stuttering in both children and a ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Stutterers Show Different Brain Development, Study Says
Children who stutter have less gray matter in regions of the brain responsible for speech than those who don t stutter, a finding that could lead to improved treatments for the condition, according to a new Canadian study. Researchers evaluated 28 children, aged 5 to 12, who underwent MRI brain scans. Half of the children had been diagnosed with stuttering, and the others acted as a control group. The brain scans revealed that the children who stuttered ha ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Occupational Hazard for Teachers?
Teachers are much more likely than people with other jobs to be diagnosed with progressive speech and language disorders, according to a new study. Teachers are in daily communication, study senior author Dr. Keith Josephs, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a Mayo news release. It s a demanding occupation, and teachers may be more sensitive to the development of speech and language impairments. Those with progressive speech and ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
New Treatments May Help Restore Speech Lost to Aphasia
Most people know the frustration of having a word on the tip of your tongue that they simply can t remember. But that passing nuisance can be an everyday occurrence for someone with aphasia, a communication disorder caused by a stroke or other brain damage that impairs the ability to process language. About 1 million Americans -- roughly one in every 250 -- are affected by aphasia, which can also impact reading and writing skills. But how they acquire the ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Right Brain Scan Could Aid in Stroke Recovery: Study
Examining the right side of the brain might help predict speech and language recovery in people who suffer a stroke on the left side of the brain, researchers say. The left side of the brain is dominant in language and speech. And, stroke damage on that side often results in difficulty speaking, naming, repeating and understanding language -- a condition called aphasia, explained the authors of the study, published March 30 in the journal Neurology . Aphas ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Oxygen Therapy Revives Brain of Toddler Who Nearly Drowned
In one of the first such confirmed cases, an Arkansas toddler who suffered severe brain injury after nearly drowning has had that brain damage reversed, using a new treatment. The treatment is known as hyperbaric oxygen therapy HBOT . It exposes a patient to pure oxygen within the confines of a carefully controlled pressurized chamber. During the therapy, the body gets three times the normal amount of oxygen, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administrat ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Singing May Help Some Stroke Victims Regain Speech
Singing helps some stroke patients suffering from non-fluent aphasia -- severe difficulties with speech -- re-learn how to speak, according to a new study. Researchers in Germany pointed out, however, it s the rhythm and formulaic phrases associated with singing -- not the melodies -- that seem to make the difference. The lyrics and phrases the patients were most familiar with had the biggest impact on the their articulation -- even when they were just spo ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28
Could a Blood Test Spot Autism in Childhood?
Researchers say an experimental blood test has shown promise as a novel way to diagnose autism in children. The test appears to be nearly 98 percent accurate in kids between the ages of 3 and 10, the researchers claimed. The test was able to predict autism, regardless of where on the spectrum an individual was, said study co-author Juergen Hahn, referring to varying degrees of autism severity. Additionally, the test indicates with very good accuracy the se ...
Healthday - Mon. Aug 28