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The way the brain processes speech could serve as a predictor of early dementia
Early dementia is typically associated with memory and thinking problems but older adults should also be vigilant about hearing and communication problems, suggest recent findings in a joint Baycrest-University of Memphis study. Within older adults who scored below the normal benchmark on a dementia screening test, but have no noticeable communication problems, scientists have discovered a new potential predictor of early dementia through abnormal function ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Mar 15
Bilateral tinnitus is hereditary
Researchers have been able to demonstrate the hereditary nature of certain forms of tinnitus. Bilateral tinnitus - that is, tinnitus in both ears - has been shown to depend on genetic factors, particularly in men. The twin study, which is published in the journal Genetics in Medicine , was conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet together with colleagues from the European research network TINNET. Ringing in the ears, a condition called tinnitus, i ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Mar 9
Number of people in US with hearing loss expected to nearly double in coming d...
In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery , Adele M. Goman, Ph.D., of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., and colleagues used U.S. population projection estimates with current prevalence estimates of hearing loss to estimate the number of adults expected to have a hearing loss through 2060. Hearing loss is a major public health issue independently associated with higher health care costs, accelerated cognitive decline, and ...
EurekAlert - Sun. Mar 5
Newborn harbor porpoises have the fastest hearing development among mammals
All mammals can hear -- but it is not an ability that is fully developed at birth. Some mammals like humans take years to fully develop their hearing abilities, but for a newborn harbour porpoise it takes less than 30 hours. This is the fastest in any studied mammal. It takes less than 30 hours for a newborn harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena to develop full hearing abilities. This is faster than any other mammals studied. Hearing is the most important of ...
EurekAlert - Sun. Mar 5
Horseback riding interventions have therapeutic benefits for people with disab...
March 2, 2017 - Physical activities incorporating horseback riding can help to improve strength, balance, and other outcomes for children and adults with a range of neuromotor, developmental, and physical disabilities, according to a report in the American Journal of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation , the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists . The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer . Such equine-assisted activities and therapies ...
EurekAlert - Sun. Mar 5
Nonsurgical treatment can correct congenital ear malformations in infants
February 28, 2017 - For infants with congenital malformations of the ear, a treatment system called EarWell can gently reshape the ear--avoiding the pain and cost of later surgery, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery reg , the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons ASPS . But treatment must begin early--preferably within the first three weeks after birth, according to the study by ASPS Memb ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Feb 28
Accepting and adapting are keys to sustaining a career after acquired hearing ...
CORVALLIS, Ore. - For adults who acquire severe hearing loss, accepting and adapting to the loss play key roles in sustaining a career and thriving in the workplace, new research from Oregon State University indicates. People who are successful at adapting to hearing loss tend to accept that they are now biologically different from how they used to be, said David Baldridge, an associate professor of management in the OSU College of Business. People who rem ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 23
More extremely preterm babies survive, live without neurological impairment
DURHAM, N.C. -- Babies born at just 22 to 24 weeks of pregnancy continue to have sobering outlooks -- only about 1 in 3 survive. But according to a new study led by Duke Health and appearing Feb. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine , those rates are showing small but measurable improvement. Compared to extremely preterm babies born a decade earlier, the study found a larger percentage are developing into toddlers without signs of moderate or severe c ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 16
Words can sound 'round' or 'sharp' without us realizing it
Our tendency to match specific sounds with specific shapes, even abstract shapes, is so fundamental that it guides perception before we are consciously aware of it, according to new research in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science . The bouba-kiki effect, originally reported over 85 years ago and replicated many times since, shows that people consistently pair the soft-sounding nonsense word bouba with soft-looking ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 9
Wired for sound: Enraging noises caused by brain connection overdrive
While many of us may find the sounds of chewing or breathing off-putting, for some they re unbearable - and new research has shown their brains are going into overdrive. The team led from Newcastle University, report new findings of the physical basis for people suffering from a condition called misophonia, a disorder where they have a hatred of sounds such as eating, chewing or repeated pen clicking. Called trigger sounds by the misophonia community, the ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 3
Pop! goes the hearing, balloon study suggests
A common birthday party favour can blow up into a problem for children--but also a bigger conversation about hearing loss, say University of Alberta researchers. U of A hearing experts Bill Hodgetts and Dylan Scott measured the noise generated by bursting balloons and were startled to find that the impact, at its highest level, was comparable to a high-powered shotgun going off next to someone s ear. They aren t out to be party-poopers, but they want to us ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Jan 31
Mandarin makes you more musical?
Mandarin makes you more musical - and at a much earlier age than previously thought. That s the suggestion of a new study from the University of California San Diego. But hold on there, overachiever parents, don t rush just yet to sign your kids up for Chinese lessons instead of piano. In a paper published in Developmental Science , an international team of researchers shows that among the preschool set - or young children between the ages of 3 and 5 - nat ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Jan 20