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Mom-to-Be's Antidepressant Use May Be Tied to Speech Issues in Child
Children whose mothers used an often-prescribed type of antidepressant during pregnancy may be more likely to develop speech and language disorders, a new study suggests. Researchers found that mothers who bought selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor SSRI drugs at least twice during pregnancy were 37 percent more likely to have a child with a speech and or language disorder than those who did not take the antidepressants. SSRIs include medicines such as C ...
Healthday - Thu. Oct 20
Exposure to SSRIs during pregnancy associated with increased risk of speech/la...
The children of mothers who had depression-related psychiatric disorders and purchased selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors SSRIs at least twice when they were pregnant had an increased risk for speech language disorders but further studies are needed before conclusions can be drawn about possible clinical implications, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry . The use of SSRIs during pregnancy is increasing. SSRIs cross the placenta ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Oct 12
Mice sing like a jet-engine
Wild mice, rats and also many other rodents produce ultrasonic songs that they use for courting and territorial defense. These love songs are often studied in mice to find cures for stuttering and autism. However, until now it was not established how mice can make such ultrasonic sounds, which is important if you want to explain why drug treatments or gene mutations change songs. We found that mice make ultrasound in a way never found before in any animal ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Oct 10
When silencing phantom noises is a matter of science
With a clever approach, researchers point to the first gene that could be protective of tinnitus -- that disturbing ringing in the ear many of us hear, when no sound is present. Ringing in the ears or hearing of a sound inside one s head when no external sound is actually present is known as tinnitus. It s a common problem that affects more than 1 person in every 10. While many learn to live with it, tinnitus can become much more than a minor ringing or bu ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 7
Chronic Sinusitis Associated With Certain Rare Head and Neck Cancers among Eld...
In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery , Daniel C. Beachler, Ph.D., M.H.S., and Eric A. Engels, M.D., M.P.H., of the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md., evaluated the associations of chronic sinusitis with subsequent head and neck cancer in an elderly population. Acute sinusitis is a common inflammatory condition of the sinuses often caused by viral or bacterial infections. The condition is considered chronic when the ep ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 7
Researchers find evidence of 'hidden hearing loss' in college-age human subjects
Boston, Mass. -- Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear have, for the first time, linked symptoms of difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments with evidence of cochlear synaptopathy, a condition known as hidden hearing loss, in college-age human subjects with normal hearing sensitivity. In a study of young adults who may regularly overexpose their ears to loud sounds, a research team led by St 233 phane Maison, Ph.D. , showed a significant ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 7
Researchers find evidence of 'hidden hearing loss' in college-age human subjects
Boston, Mass. -- Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear have, for the first time, linked symptoms of difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments with evidence of cochlear synaptopathy, a condition known as hidden hearing loss, in college-age human subjects with normal hearing sensitivity. In a study of young adults who may regularly overexpose their ears to loud sounds, a research team led by St 233 phane Maison, Ph.D. , showed a significant ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Sep 13
Child stimulation intervention fosters early child development in rural Peru
Scientists from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute Swiss TPH and the Peruvian Instituto de Investigaci 243 n Nutricional IIN adapted the urban-based Peruvian National Early Child Development Programme Wawa Wasi and brought it to the doorstep of people living in the rural Cajamarca region. In a community-randomised trial they showed that children aged 6 to 35 months whose mothers playfully interacted with them for half an hour daily performed up ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Sep 9
Chronic Sinusitis Associated With Certain Rare Head and Neck Cancers among Eld...
In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery , Daniel C. Beachler, Ph.D., M.H.S., and Eric A. Engels, M.D., M.P.H., of the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md., evaluated the associations of chronic sinusitis with subsequent head and neck cancer in an elderly population. Acute sinusitis is a common inflammatory condition of the sinuses often caused by viral or bacterial infections. The condition is considered chronic when the ep ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Sep 8
When silencing phantom noises is a matter of science
With a clever approach, researchers point to the first gene that could be protective of tinnitus -- that disturbing ringing in the ear many of us hear, when no sound is present. Ringing in the ears or hearing of a sound inside one s head when no external sound is actually present is known as tinnitus. It s a common problem that affects more than 1 person in every 10. While many learn to live with it, tinnitus can become much more than a minor ringing or bu ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Sep 1
New diagnostic instrument sees deeper into the ear
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- A new device developed by researchers at MIT and a physician at Connecticut Children s Medical Center could greatly improve doctors ability to accurately diagnose ear infections. That could drastically reduce the estimated 2 million cases per year in the United States where such infections are incorrectly diagnosed and unnecessary antibiotics are prescribed. Such overprescriptions are considered a major cause of antibiotic resistance. T ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Aug 26
JNeurosci: Highlights from the Aug. 24 issue
Tone Deafness After Stroke Linked to Damage to Right Side of the Brain Stroke patients with tone deafness and other forms of amusia exhibit damage to the right temporal lobe of the brain. Using an advanced method for analyzing relationships between brain damage and behavior, researchers studied the brains of 77 stroke survivors and found impaired music ability was linked to lesions in areas of the right temporal lobe. Patients whose musical deficits persis ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Aug 25