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Cooling technique protects speech during brain surgery
A new cooling technique can both protect the brain s speech centers during surgery and pinpoint the areas separately responsible for word formation and speech timing. This is according to a study led by researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Iowa published in the journal Neuron online Feb. 25, 2016. Patients in the study were put under local anesthesia for an initial part of their brain operations, some of which were to remove tu ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 25
New Cooling Technique Might Aid Brain Surgery: Study
A new cooling technique appears to safeguard a patient s speech centers during brain surgery, a small, preliminary study suggests. This approach, combined with verbal checks, also helped improve understanding of brain areas involved in word formation and speech timing, the researchers said. The technique used in the study is called focal cooling, in which miniature devices are used to cool quarter-sized areas of the brain by as much as 10 degrees Celsius 5 ...
Healthday - Thu. Feb 25
Stroke patients' speech loss linked to loss of brain interconnections
Amsterdam, NL, February 22, 2015 - When brain regions that control speech and reading comprehension are destroyed due to blockage of blood flow, patients are often unable to speak or comprehend spoken or written language. These difficulties with language, or aphasia, are a common symptom in the aftermath of stroke. However, in a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience , researchers report that damage to the underlying connections amon ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Feb 24
Common problem for older adults: Losing the 5 key senses
It s a well-known fact that aging can lead to losing one s senses vision, smell, hearing, touch, and taste. In previous studies, researchers have learned about the consequences of experiencing a decline in a single sense. For example, losing senses of smell, vision, and hearing have all been linked to cognitive decline, poor mental health, and increased mortality. Losing the sense of taste can lead to poor nutrition and even death in certain instances. How ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Feb 22
Common problem for older adults: Losing the five key senses
It s a well-known fact that aging can lead to losing one s senses vision, smell, hearing, touch, and taste. In previous studies, researchers have learned about the consequences of experiencing a decline in a single sense. For example, losing senses of smell, vision, and hearing have all been linked to cognitive decline, poor mental health, and increased mortality. Losing the sense of taste can lead to poor nutrition and even death in certain instances. How ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Feb 19
A tunnel through the head
This news release is available in German . Humans use the time delay between the arrival of a sound wave at each ear to discern the direction of the source. In frogs, lizards and birds the distance between the ears is too small. However, they have a cavity connecting the eardrums, in which internal and external sound waves are superimposed. Using a universal mathematical model, researchers at the Technical University of Munich TUM have now for the first ti ...
EurekAlert - Thu. Feb 18
For Stroke Patients, Temporary Easing of Symptoms Can Be Deceiving
A quick improvement in symptoms before a stroke patient arrives at the hospital doesn t necessarily mean a better outcome, a new study finds. Patients with very early rapid neurological improvement when first examined at the hospital still need to be considered for therapy to dissolve blood clots, given the high rate of unfavorable outcome, study author Dr. Clotilde Balucani said in a news release from the American Stroke Association ASA . Her team was sla ...
Healthday - Thu. Feb 18
Tip sheet: Johns Hopkins researchers present findings at science conference in...
What American Association for the Advancement of Science 2016 Annual Meeting When Feb. 11-15, 2016 Where Washington Marriott Wardman Park 2660 Woodley Road NW, Washington, DC 20008 Embargoed for release until Feb. 13 at 1 p.m. ET Big Data Clinical Realities and the Human Dimensions of Interoperable Data Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016, 1-2 30 p.m. Marshall Ballroom North Washington Marriott Wardman Park Researcher John Aucott, M.D. , assistant professor of medicin ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Feb 15
Study of cognitive development in deaf children revisits longstanding debate
Storrs, CT - A team of researchers at the University of Connecticut is reexamining a decades-long debate as to whether deaf children should learn sign language to maximize their potential for optimal development. Research has shown that children born deaf frequently exhibit learning deficits and as a result, often underperform in school. Yet research on deaf children has also found children from signing families develop language, cognition and literacy on ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Feb 13
Language juggling rewires bilingual brain
Bilinguals use and learn language in ways that change their minds and brains, which has consequences -- many positive, according to Judith F. Kroll, a Penn State cognitive scientist. Recent studies reveal the remarkable ways in which bilingualism changes the brain networks that enable skilled cognition, support fluent language performance and facilitate new learning, said Kroll, Distinguished Professor, psychology, linguistics and women s studies. Research ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Feb 13
Birth Defect Tied to Zika Virus Can Leave Children With Lifetime of Health Woes
The thousands of babies born in Brazil with abnormally small heads and brains -- believed to be caused by infection in the womb with the Zika virus -- typically face a lifetime of health challenges, doctors say. But not all are destined to a life of medical woes. The Brazilian babies -- who may number more than 4,000 -- have the condition known as microcephaly. And in 85 percent to 90 percent of microcephaly cases, infants also suffer from stunted brain de ...
Healthday - Tue. Feb 9
'How much does it hurt?' For preschoolers, cognitive development can limit abi...
February 3, 2016 - Rate your pain on a scale of zero to ten --for most adults and older children, it s a simple concept. But preschool-aged children generally lack the cognitive skills needed to make reliable pain ratings, according to an article in PAIN reg , the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain IASP . The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer . Using a scale to estimate and report pain intensity is a complex me ...
EurekAlert - Tue. Feb 9